HORSES HAVE THINNER SKIN AND MAY FEEL PAIN MORE THAN HUMANS

The image above is showing horse skin on the left with the thinner epidermis. On the right, human skin. Image courtesy of Catalyst.  

The image above is showing horse skin on the left with the thinner epidermis. On the right, human skin. Image courtesy of Catalyst.

 

For those who think horses don't feel pain as we do - you could be right. They may feel far more. Australian TV programme 'Catalyst' asked vet pathologist Dr. Lydia Tong to look at the differences between horse and human skin, something that has surprisingly never been studied before. She found the epidermis (the outer layer of the skin) is thinner in horses and they have a higher density of 'pain sensing' nerve endings than we do. So what happens to the great whip debate now I wonder?

This information was revealed as part of an interesting film looking at the use of the whip in racing and is well worth a watch. Professor Paul McGreevy is also interviewed here, who has authored a number of studies analysing use of the whip in racing. The information about the horse's skin starts around 12.30.

The image above is showing horse skin on the left with the thinner epidermis. On the right, human skin. 

You can watch the programme here: http://www.abc.net.au/catalyst/stories/4201890.htm

Further information here: http://m.foxsports.com.au/more-sports/horse-racing/pressure-mounts-to-ban-whips-as-new-study-indicates-horses-feel-pain-when-whipped/story-e6frf41l-1227275365083